Home 9 Relocation 9 In order to immigrate to the Netherlands from Japan, the Japanese national will need to obtain a residence permit

In order to immigrate to the Netherlands from Japan, the Japanese national will need to obtain a residence permit

by | Apr 12, 2022 14:04

Foreign nationals who wish to remain in the Netherlands for long periods of time, compatible with the purpose to work or study in the country, will need to apply for a residence permit that suits their needs.
 
The process can differ according to the purpose of the stay. Japanese citizens benefit from a somewhat simplified manner of entering the Netherlands due to the fact that, unlike other non-EU foreign nationals, they do not need a long-stay visa (the MVV). However, they will need to apply for a temporary residence permit that will suit their purpose of stay.

The following situations are common for those who plan to immigrate to the Netherlands from Japan:
 

– Employment: a residence permit is needed for working in paid employment in the Netherlands; Japanese nationals can also apply for work in a high-level position, as a highly-skilled migrant;

– Study: Japanese nationals admitted by a Dutch University or another educational institution remain in the country based on a residence permit for study purposes;

– Entrepreneurship: for Japanese nationals who can contribute to the Dutch economy by starting a business; the Netherlands Enterprise Agency is in charge of the programmes designed for foreign entrepreneurs; this can be a suitable way to immigrate to the Netherlands from Japan;

– Family reunification: when one of the spouses already lives in the Netherlands, the other spouse, who is a Japanese national can apply for a residence permit; the scheme also extends to some family members.

 
The reason for which you choose to move to the Netherlands from Japan will determine the documents that are required for the residence permit application.  
If your purpose is to immigrate to the Netherlands from Japan, then a temporary stay will not suffice. You will need to become a permanent resident and, if desired, apply for Dutch citizenship once you fulfill the conditions for a minimum lawful stay in the country.
  
Permanent residence is obtained after a five-year stay in the country. This is often the goal for those who wish to relocate to the Netherlands from Japan and it is also a natural step towards becoming a Dutch citizen, provided that the Japanese national wishes to take this step.
 
The conditions for obtaining permanent residence are the following:
 

– Minimum stay: the applicant must have had a lawful, uninterrupted stay in the country for at least 5 years before applying for the permanent residence permit;

– Registration: the Japanese national applying for Dutch permanent residence needs to be registered in the Municipal Personal Records Database;

– Means: one must prove that he/she has sufficient financial means (sustainable and independent income);

– Integration: civic integration is required; this is shown through a diploma attesting the fact that the holder can speak, read and write and understand Dutch to a satisfactory degree;

– Others: the applicant must also show the temporary residence permit when applying for the permanent one.

 
Japanese nationals who wish to immigrate to the Netherlands from Japan should know that they are subject to a number of costs, according to the residence permit they apply for.

Some of these costs include the following:
 

– Highly skilled migrant: ​​€ 345;

– Self-employed individual (first application): ​​€ 1446;

– Permanent residence permit: € 207;

– Permanent residence permit for minor children: € 69.

 
Other costs will also be in place, such as those for preparing certain documents, especially for entrepreneurs who open a Dutch company.

Source: Immigration Netherlands, March 2022

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