irs

The IRS Says It’s Raising Tax Brackets Due to Rising Inflation

November 12, 2021 | xpath.global

The IRS has announced that income limits for federal tax rates will be higher in 2022 due to accelerated inflation. This adjustment means significant changes for taxpayers brackets, impacting their financial planning and tax strategies.

Impact on Tax Brackets

With the top tax rate remaining at 37%, married couples will need nearly $20,000 more in earnings next year to enter the highest tax bracket. This change underscores the broader economic implications of inflation on households’ financial standing.

Rising Consumer Prices

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, consumer prices surged by 6.2 percent in October compared to the same period last year, outpacing the previous month’s increase of 5.4 percent. Families are feeling the pinch as prices soar across various essential categories like fuel and groceries.

Transitioning into the specifics, the basic income tax rates established by Congress in the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act remain unchanged. However, the IRS’s adjustments reflect a necessary response to the current economic landscape, where inflation is significantly impacting purchasing power and household budgets.

These adjustments represent a 3 percent increase in total compared to the previous year’s more modest 1% adjustment. As a result, taxpayers across the nation will need to navigate the revised thresholds for the seven tax brackets in 2022, considering their implications for financial planning and budget management.

Bureau of Labor Statistics:

  • • 10% tax bracket: single individuals earning up to $10,275 and married couples filing jointly earning up to $20,550.
  • • 12% tax bracket: single filers earning more than $10,275 and married couples filing jointly earning over $20,550.
  • • 22% tax bracket: single filers earning more than $41,775 and married couples filing jointly earning over $83,550. 
  • • 24% tax bracket: single filers earning more than $89,075 and married couples filing jointly earning over $178,150.
  • • 32% tax bracket: single filers earning more than $170,050 and married couples filing jointly earning over $340,100. 
  • • 35% tax bracket: single filers earning more than $215,950 and married couples filing jointly earning over $431,900. 
  • • 37% tax bracket: single filers earning more than $539,900 and married couples filing jointly earning over $647,850.

The personal exemption will stay at $0 in 2021, according to the IRS; the personal exemption was repealed as part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

The government also announced that the standard deduction will be increased to account for inflation. For married couples, it will rise to $25,900 next year, an increase of $800 over the current tax year. The standard deduction for single taxpayers will rise to $12,950, a $400 increase, according to the IRS.

In conclusion, while these changes in income limits for federal tax rates may seem incremental, they carry significant implications for taxpayers. It’s essential for individuals and families to stay informed about these updates and adapt their financial strategies accordingly in the face of evolving economic conditions.

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